Career Change To Insurance - Which Company?

Discussion in 'Getting Started Selling Insurance' started by NewAgent322, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. NewAgent322
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    NewAgent322 New Member

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    Hi everyone, I'm new here and this is my first post.

    I've been working in sales all my life. After being laid off in September after working in Medical sales for the same company for the past six years, I decided at 31 years old to stop relying on someone else for security and stability. I want to eventually go into business for myself. But I need to build the bridge to get there.

    I decided to get my 2-15 license to start. I will be taking the 40 hour prep course here in Florida. And I will be licensed by the end of November.

    Three companies so far are interested and I've had interviews with two of the three.

    My question is, based on your experience, who should I go with?

    Prudential
    (I have an interview with them on Thursday of this week.)

    New England Financial, a Met Life Company
    (This company does Life and other things as well. If I get licensed they will reimburse me the fees for the test and will also pay for me to get series 6 license which will broaden my earning capacity a little. I won't be putting all my eggs in one basket so to speak.)

    Western & Southern Life or Western & Southern Financial Group (this company pretty much focuses just on Life) They pay a $575/week salary for the first seven weeks and then you're 100% commission based.

    PLEASE HELP WITH YOUR OPINIONS AND PAST EXPERIENCE WITH THESE COMPANIES.

    ALSO, PLEASE REFER ME TO OTHER AGENCIES OR COMPANIES IF THERE'S SOMEONE BETTER OUT THERE HERE IN FLORIDA.

    Thanks
     
  2. Dave020
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    Dave020 Super Moderator Moderator

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    In addition to these three companies (all good), IMHO you should also consider interviewing with the following (to see who has a best fit for your skill set and desired target market):

    *MassMutual
    *NY Life
    *Northwestern Mutual
    *Guardian
     
  3. xrac
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    xrac Well-Known Member

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    Talk to Metlife also.
     
  4. Josh
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    Josh Well-Known Member

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    Not for nothing, but there is a TON of info about your options and the pros and cons of each.
     
  5. DHK
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    DHK Well-Known Member

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    New England Financial is part of Metlife (as stated by the OP).

    I think the compensation is the same between both... but NEF focuses more on the higher-end market while MetLife is very much "blue collar friendly".

    Just my impressions.

    However, NONE of it matters unless you can learn how to prospect and you can get a good mentor to help you learn the business and close cases.

    Focus on the local agency over the actual company. Once you have the skills, you can write your own ticket at any company you choose.
     
  6. ///MJay
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    ///MJay Well-Known Member

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    I am a former W&S sales manager if you have any questions I would be happy to answer. @ W&S as will all career agent outfits you need to have a lot of faith in the management team in your area. What part of Fla you in? I know a few of the managers down there.
     
  7. Guest
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    Guest Guest

    You will serve your clients best by being an indePendent broker who serves his customers instead of pushy companies. I work through various agencies, one of which is davidrutstein.com in FL.
     
  8. OH-healthcare
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    OH-healthcare Active Member

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    Why use just one company? Why limit yourself to a handful of products? It would be in the best interest of your customer to have access to the best product that would suit the individual. And that would mean being independent and having multiple appointments with multiple insurance companies. This will give you greater flexibility and the ability to provide various product lines. You don't necessarily have to have a P & C with a H & L license but view yourself as a health or life consultant, rather than a MetLife guy, etc. imho
     
  9. VolAgent
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    VolAgent Well-Known Member

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    I suggest you ignore these two opinions.

    It is in the best interest of your client for you to still be in the business 5 years from now, and for you to conduct yourself in an ethical manner. If a career shop increases your odds for success, then that is where you need to be.

    Also, contrary to what everyone believes, including most career agents and managers, most career shops don't hold you captive. Depending on the agency, at Mass, MetLife/New England Financial, New York Life, Guardian and Pru, you will have some ability to offer outside products. You won't at AGLA, not sure about W&S, and while you may at NWM, you'll get so much pressure not to, you might as well be strictly captive.

    Also, Mass, MetLife, NYL, Guardian and Pru do have good products. I firmly believe that 10% is the breaking point. It is worth paying slightly more to get a product that I consider to have better conversion options from a company I believe in more strongly.

    Ultimately, you have to decide for yourself where to go. But remember, they are not a client if you won't be here 5 years from now. They are just a transaction. If you want clients, you need a gameplan to be in the business 5 years from now, and a support system that will help you get there.
     
  10. Larry Tew
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    Larry Tew Well-Known Member

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    AXA is another "captive" with good access to other companies through their "brokerage" arm.
     

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