Clients with Bi-Polar

Jun 8, 2007

  1. lynno
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    lynno New Member

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    I have been running into alot of issues with Bi-Polar clients. They get rated very high, or declined, mostly declined. Especially in children. Why do they look at Bi-Polar to be such a bad thing?
     
    lynno, Jun 8, 2007
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  2. Tar Rat
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    Tar Rat New Member

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    I've run into the same thing. I think it's because bi-polar is associated with hypocondria, and the medications they prescibe for bi-polar are expensive and cause tons of side-effects--leading to more health problems. I personally don't believe in bi-polar or depression as medical conditions, I think the chemical imbalances are actually symptoms of negative thinking, instead of vice versa, which is the popular opinion. I mean, would you want to insure someone who is actually *trying* to make themselves unhealthy?
     
    Tar Rat, Jun 8, 2007
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  3. Guest
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    Guest Guest

    Probably from reading my posts.

    Seriously, my wife was slim and trim before she was diagnosed. The meds caused her to blow up like a balloon in no time flat. Doc says they suppress the metabolism, Zyprexa gives you the hunger of a ravenous bear, all documented. Morbid obesity. Strike One. Doesn't mean it can't be overcome.

    Zyprexa has now been found to contribute to Type II Diabetes (as does obesity). Strike Two.

    Not sure where the High Cholesterol came from, probably food. Strike 3 you're out. But just for good measure:

    High Blood Pressure. Ball Four. Oops, wrong batter. (Batter will make you fatter). Uninsurable, eventually.

    Then there's tartive diskonesia (sp?), which is mostly irreversable. She has a mild case, actually kinda cute. Involuntary mouth movements and such. Hers is not out of hand at all, caught it early.

    That's my guess. From what I've been reading, I wouldn't doubt that the underwriters/actuaries at the insurance companies know as much or more than the docs and pharmaceutical reps about the meds and particularly the statistical probability of what they might do over time. Since everyone is medicating (see the other thread). Just a guess.
     
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    Guest, Jun 8, 2007
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  4. lynno
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    lynno New Member

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    Bi-Polar is a legit condition. I have it and my kid has it. She is medicated, I am not. Mine isn't bad, hers is very bad. Without meds, she can't be reasoned with and gets very aggressive. On meds, she is ok. But seeing this first hand, I don't see where it is something to be threatening. Just my experience with the condition.

    Any child that I have tried to write with Bi-Polar is automatically declined, yet adults are generally accepted with a high rating.
     
    lynno, Jun 8, 2007
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  5. Bob_The_Insurance_Guy
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    Bob_The_Insurance_Guy Guru

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    Sorry to burst your bubble Tar Rat, but I'm married to a clinical Social Worker, and Bi-Polar is very real. The reason insurance companies turn them down is because it can lead to suicidal tendencies, even while on meds, and under control.

    Only STM companies will consider taking Bi-Polars.

    I've placed my two Bi-Polar clients on STM with two companies. It is true, though, that habitual depression can lead to clinical depression. If you believe in something long and hard enough, it does get internalized.

    Bi-Polar is different. It is a chemical imbalance, and a malfunction with the synapses in the brain stem. My wife has been a Social Worker for the past 18 years, and has seen it more times than she cares to.

    Try putting them on STM with either Assurant or HPA (the one who took my two clients). Celtic also has a STM plan.
     
  6. Guest
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    Guest Guest

    You know what, Tar Rat? I agree with you. And further, in every case I know about, there is childhood trauma, and I believe that "errant" thought processes begin to occur very early and become subconcious, and definitely affect brain chemistry. Can it be reversed by "proper" thinking? After how many years? Who knows, that's a battle I can't even begin to wage successfully (although I try). I don't even BEGIN to have the time to fight the former battle that it is thought/environmental-reactive-behaviorally caused.

    But let's just keep it between you and me, okay? ;)
     
    Guest, Jun 8, 2007
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  7. Guest
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    Guest Guest

    Yep, there is empirical evidence all over the place that it may be hereditary. My wife is baby of EIGHT children. 4 girls, 4 boys (okay, men, they think). She has a sister that is worse, another sister not so bad, a brother attempted suicide but is controlling it, another brother that is mild. She had an aunt (that I only met once, a long time ago, just before she died) that apparently was pretty bad symptomatically. But, they all also had the same environment. So, is it genetic, environmental, or a combination? There are some who think it demonic, but geez, I won't even go there. But there is the story of the demoniac in the Bible...and some of the things my wife has "hallucinated" or seen and heard during an episode...defies explanation.

    Lynno, you will have prayers on behalf of you and your daughter. THAT is ultimately the most powerful thing in the universe, or leads to Him, anyway. Sometimes when we have done all, it is all we can do. And sometimes that is the point, with many things. Rest in the knowledge that you and your daughter are prayed for. God bless you.
     
    Guest, Jun 8, 2007
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  8. Guest
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    See, I KNEW it!!! I've got to show this to my wife. She's been asking for years, "What does this stem from? Does it stem from my family? Or does it stem from my childhood?" Now I can tell her: "It STEMS from your BRAIN STEM!!!" And from SIN! I mean SYNAPSE! Same thing. Right? Sin is a malfunction, really. JUST KIDDING (I think)!!!!

    :D :laugh: :biggrin: :goofy: :twitchy: :swoon: :D

    Okay, we have found out that LAUGHTER, HEARTY LAUGHTER is sometimes good medicine. Maybe run this by your wife, but my wife seems to do better when she accepts and lightens up a little about her condition. I understand, believe me, it is very serious. But she always wanted to deny it and not face it and not let anyone know. Over the years, we have let almost everyone know. And no one says a thing. Occasionally we'll make a joke. Sometimes even around family. Not derogatory, just neutral. For instance, we were at my Dad's one time quite awhile back when she was having an episode. I'm a Jr. so his name and mine are the same. When we left, she said to him "See you later, Ralph!". Just as serious. Ralph is the name of her first husband. We all get a great kick out of that story to this day. Especially my wife!!! She gets SO tickled. There are many more minor incidents like that, that are "safe". I think it is good medicine. It seems to be, empirically.

    Well, there go two more of my widow's mites...
     
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    Guest, Jun 8, 2007
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  9. insuremojo
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    insuremojo Super Genius

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    Without creditable coverage you are going to feel like you're beating your head against the proverbial wall. Now WITH creditable coverage there are companies that will take bi-polars. Aetna comes to mind.
     
  10. somarco
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    somarco GA Medicare Expert

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    Bob -

    Aetna will sometimes take a bipolar.
     
    somarco, Jun 8, 2007
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