Does this Position Exist ?

Oct 28, 2015

  1. Gulfman
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    Gulfman Guru

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    Hi Friends,

    There are companies here in my area that write some pretty large commercial policies.

    QUESTION:
    "How tough would it be to get a job doing lead generation at a Large Commercial Firm?​

    (ie, cold calling biz, emails, mailings, ---anything to drive biz).

    Does this position exist?



    THANKS FOR YOUR INPUT!
     
    Gulfman, Oct 28, 2015
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  2. rbadoux
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    rbadoux Expert

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    Although this position does not have a defined title, many acting agents are doing those responsibilities along with selling. It really depends on which company you decide to work for.
     
    rbadoux, Oct 28, 2015
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  3. VolAgent
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    VolAgent Guru

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    Some agencies have a marketing manager. For a large P&C agency there are two types of marketing. Marketing to potential insureds and marketing to carriers as far as getting appointed and placing risks. Getting carriers to offer competitive quotes and then actually place the risk can be an art in and of itself for large commercial accounts.

    If they don't already have a person in either position, then you would need to sell them on why it would be a benefit versus the producers doing it all themselves. Also, your comp is probably going to come out of the producers' pockets, so you could expect an uphill battle.
     
    VolAgent, Oct 28, 2015
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  4. Arnage150
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    Yes it does. I saw it in an agency a while back. To give you some insight, that agency was around 10 million in commissions. And they had one full time telemarketer. They used him to go after certain classes of business they targeted.

    I don't know why anyone is their right mind would want to do that. Its basically doing the hardest part of the sales process and not reaping any of the rewards (commissions).
     
  5. Gulfman
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    Yeah, you're Right. Why would anyone want to learn how to prospect Commercial PC Insurance?----My Thinking is...a telemarketer would definitely be paid salary plus bonus for policies closed.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
    Gulfman, Oct 28, 2015
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  6. Arnage150
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    I sense a little sarcasm. You are not learning how to prospect P&C insurance by telemarketing. You are given a phone list and a script to read. You would be learning how to cold call. No different than cold calling for motorized scooters or ginger snaps. It's not exactly a hard job to land, nor is it a difficult skill to learn. No one wants to do it because people don't deal well with rejection.

    Most insurance brokers are in charge or their own marketing plan. Cold calling may be one part of it but marketing plans usually involves many avenues.
    If cold calling doesn't bother you than all the more reason to become a broker. Why give your hard earned telemarketing lead to another salesperson when you could be closing them yourself and building a book of business so you have something to show for it after 5 years instead of a job skill on a resume.
     
  7. Gulfman
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    I appreciate the comments and i get what you are saying. My thinking was you can LEARN how to prospect for LARGE COMM. policies if you are in the game WITH the right company AND get a little salary UNTIL YOU get your feet wet.

    It seems to me that prospecting for a PC policy for a apartment complex, car lot or HOA is a skill that is not taught in books. Someone has to show you. That someone is not working at your local ALLSTATE office.

    (AM I RIGHT OR WRONG?)

    I hear you about DIY routine and that certainly is the goal---build you own book. However, the value of training in a good outfit seems like it would be a good route.

    I don't know...just throwing it out there to get opinions and suggestions.

    Do you think that someone at ALLSTATE is going to know how to pitch a car lot? What about selling a policy to a restaurant owner?

    (AM I RIGHT OR WRONG?)

    My point being, the chances of you being successful as a Comm. PC agent, should be better AND you'll get hired faster, if you "have been" in the COMM.PC game.

    Am i right or wrong?

    Anyone ?


     
    Gulfman, Oct 29, 2015
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  8. dean8287
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    Gulfman, I like your determination but you are over complicating it. Go work as a commercial agent for a broker as mentioned above and make the calls for yourself. Start with smaller accounts and over time natural progression will lead you to writing larger and larger accounts. If you really want specific training try to land a sales position with some of the direct commercial carriers like Sentry or Federated. Your training at direct companies will be excellent, but pay in the long run will be much better at a broker.
     
    dean8287, Oct 29, 2015
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  9. barbagentsnet
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    Sure it does - they probably have lead generators or a call center - check into it. There are call centers that sell or collect leads for all kinds of insurance. :err:
     
  10. thecommercialguy
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    I've only prospected commercial and was given no text book to learn it because there was none. This was at one of the 3 largest commercial P&C brokers. The quote above is true, but the buyers for larger commercial P&C prospects (the ones the larger commercial P&C brokers want to obtain as clients) tend not to be on such lists from my experience. Thus, it comes down to leveraging everything you have from cold-calling to networking to reach that buyer organically with your hands.

    The most important aspect in any sale is reaching the buyer and understanding his political decision making environment. The larger the deal, the more people involved, so the one who best balances between a product/rate competition and political battle with existing broker/agent usually wins the deal.

    If your telemarketing strategies can navigate the political maze faster than the agent who is pounding pavement at happy hour and award nights, pitch yourself as that and you should be given a chance. However, if you don't have strong reasoning for how you can decrease the burden on the navigating task, they probably will have difficulty giving you the time of day for such a position since they are lost on how to better their game and need good reasoning to change their ways.

    I think the future is in setting up brokers/agents as media companies (not legally, but just in practice as everyone other industry is already doing), by putting out content that can be used in helping prospects long before they ever think of giving you a shot at their business. It's how relationships are built today in our ever increasing online world unless you have a rich dad that could circumvent the process for you. It's only a few in our industry that have caught on to this because we've all been there.....we're trying to make a living first and feel that changing our ways for a longer term game could compromise our short term win rate.

    Let me know if you want to talk more.

    Hayato
    closingcommercial dot com
     
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