I Feel Lousy that I Quit my Job, is the Market Bad for Insurance Right Now?

Discussion in 'Life Insurance Forum' started by rehemazakari, Aug 10, 2017.

  1. rehemazakari
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    rehemazakari New Member

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    I'm 23 and recently just quit my job with American Income Life. The reason I finally quit is because I hadn't been paid in 3 weeks, the job being 100% commission based.

    For me being a recent college graduate, I had bills that were due and mixed with the fact that my car broke on the way to work, and no sales in weeks I couldn't afford to keep running.

    My bosses didn't see it that way. It was my fault, I didn't book enough appointments, It made no sense to quit a full time job to work part time making calls for other co workers, but I explained I needed steady pay and the bills I had coming up that no pay in three weeks and working 60+ hrs a week wasn't covering it.

    My whole family was against the job, but in the end I didn't regret working there, they showed me I had a lot of growing up to do and my facial expression and energy needed work. I was sad to leave, which is why I accepted a job making calls for people because nobody on my team really enjoyed making preset calls, but it was one of the things I was really good at.

    I don't know if it was me or if the market is really bad for selling it. A lot of people I met were really suspicious of us, next to none could afford the insurance. My grandfather told me the market was bad for insurance right now, people are trying to cover their bills.

    Is it possible the market will pick back up anytime soon or is this a cause I should just mark as lost?
     
  2. rousemark
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    rousemark Well-Known Member

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    I have heard that the market is bad for selling insurance and people are struggling to pay their bills since the day I went into the business in 1971. Yet, I have known Life and health agents that have been able to make great incomes all during that time. The fact is people have more disposable income today than ever before. Unemployment is lower than I ever remember it being. Every employer in this area is begging for workers. If you were actually working 60 hours per week and made no sales for three weeks you need training.
     
  3. rehemazakari
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    rehemazakari New Member

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    Thank you for your honest answer.

    My issue is that I listen to negativity a whole lot, something you don't need to hear when dealing with clients who can and will tell you no in a heartbeat.

    I know I wasn't trained well enough but our office only had three managers and originally six (now three) agents running packs. I couldn't handle the no's anymore and mixed with no check (chargebacks were responsible) I started doubting myself and saw myself getting more and more desperate for a sale than trying to help the people who needed it.

    I'm currently working the phones for a former co worker who had more confidence and him being an older male, he was able to talk to them more efficiently than a naive 24 yr old.

    Nothing ever told me this was a bad idea. I saw in this company more than just money and running and seeing how other people lived and worked made me realize a lot about myself.

    I think I need to grow up more before going back to this (I didn't spend $400 on a license just to use it for three months and quit)

    Can I ask how you blocked out the negativity?
     
  4. scagnt83
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    scagnt83 Well-Known Member

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    When you have bills to pay and are facing eviction, you have no choice but to ignore the negativity and just keep putting one foot in front of the other.

    I agree with Rous, if you actually were working 60 hours per week (no offense but most agents dont work anywhere near those hours... not real work at least) then you were doing something seriously wrong.

    Find a better carrier to work for, and find a mentor who is successful and bring them in on cases for a few months. You will make 50% less... but 50% of something is better than 100% of nothing. More importantly, you will learn how to be successful for the long term.
     
  5. rehemazakari
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    rehemazakari New Member

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    American Income had us working in the field from 1-9pm, that didn't include travel time, OL (one legs meaning a husband and wife weren't together) or people not being home after you drove 30 and 45 mins to go out to see them.

    I was doing something wrong I agree, but with lack of managers to help you and my attitude going down with each day of no's, people canceling policies, and chargebacks taking my check, it just wasn't making me feel good to get up in the morning.

    I feel bad that I quit, but I agree it was the best thing to do for right now. I want to go back but I need to make some real changes and the first is blocking out negativity.

    My family was against this job from the beginning. But at 23 (now 24) no kids, I really didn't have a reason to NOT take the risk and try this company. Well I take that back, I have bills that need to be paid.

    100% commission base was hard. It really was like running your own business. I don't want to talk bad about the company because the people did nothing but try to help me, my issue is I take things personally and get hurt easily because I've been hurt majorly in the past.

    Just putting one foot in front of the other is hard at first, but experience has taught me it gets better the more I keep going. I have fallbacks and issues and start remembering all the bad stuff in my life, which brings me back to depression and sadness.

    I've had depression for 7 years, took meds but stopped taking them at my family's behest, went through withdrawal, and was told there was nothing wrong with me, that depression was a choice.

    Without going too deep into my personal life, I just don't know how to handle my family right now, atm they are on the whole 'I told you so' kick. I don't listen, I just do what I want to do. This was a bad idea.
     
  6. DHK
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    DHK Well-Known Member

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    I think you need a new paradigm on how you view the world. Stephen R. Covey used to say that if you were in Chicago, but you had a map of Detroit, no amount of "affirmation" or "positive thinking" was going to help you.

    Here's the truth: In your view, making calls feels like 'professional begging'. You get to feeling like everyone else gets to determine whether or not you get to eat today. If that's how you often feel... then you need to read this post:

    http://www.insurance-forums.net/for...top-10-earn-128-070-a-t88843.html#post1187030
     
  7. scagnt83
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    scagnt83 Well-Known Member

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    If you have a fragile ego or mental state this type of job is going to be one of two things: the best thing ever for you to get over your issues, or the worst thing ever and make them worse. Which one depends on your mindset in approaching the career. Mindset is 90% of this career.

    Dont feel bad for quitting. Never be sorry or feel bad or apologize for looking out for yourself or doing the best thing for you.

    Make a career out of it and your family will shut up real fast. So either get over it or go find an hourly job.
     
  8. rehemazakari
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    rehemazakari New Member

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    I read over your post and your right it is a problem of mindset and not being fully prepared for what I was about to do.

    Reading that post on what the difference is was amazing and very insightful. I DO feel like phone calls was like professional begging. My boss always said to me 'Some will, Some won't, So what, Who's next'

    It was getting the people who would look at you and laugh that you were trying to help them that got to me daily.

    I think I need to be better prepared both mentally and financially before I ever take a job that is 100% commission based. I wasn't strong enough mentally or emotionally to deal with it.

    I know that the successful people in this company did exactly what I was doing, but they also booked more appointments and didn't listen to negativity.

    I think what's best for me is to focus on one thing at a time.

    ----------

    Not being paid for three weeks and getting discouraged everyday I had to work wasn't helping me

    I think I need to focus more on getting my confidence level up before I ever come back to this job.
     
  9. johndf
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    johndf Well-Known Member

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    If the only reason you are determined to stay in the business is because as you put it "I didn't spend $400 on a license just to use it for three months and quit" Your are sticking around for all the wrong reasons. If you are that mentally fragile where if you hear the word "No" or are around any negativity you go into a tailspin, this may not be the career for you. "No" is a word you must embrace.

    Two of the main reasons new agents fail in this business is that they come into this business under capitalized, meaning they do not have enough $ to carry them until they start having adequate commissions come in (which seems to be your case) They have not put together a business plan as to how much they are going to need to spend on leads, advertising, travel, etc. so they do not know what their operating costs will be. The second reason they fail is that they are not trained properly (which seems to be you also) and thrown to the wolves. Basically they have no clue what they are doing and lack product knowledge. Which is not good for them, but just as important, no good for the prospect they are talking to or possibly selling. I understand some organizations have the throw it against the wall and see what sticks philosophy because they make their money on overrides. However, sometimes you need to be proactive and ask for help and guidance and if they are not willing to give it. Find another Ins. Co. or FMO that will, there are a lot here on the Forum.

    However with that being said, you have to determine if you are passionate about the industry and what you do. I have been doing this for 34+ years, have built a successful agency (at least by my standards) have made a very comfortable income and can't wait to get up in the morning because I am excited about the opportunities that await me that day.

    If you really feel passionate about the industry, maybe your best bet is to work for an Insurance Company in a corporate role either internally or as a sales rep with a base and commission. You can eleviate some of the financial pressure, build your confidence, take your time and learn the industry and decide what type of insurance you want to specialize in. Just my thoughts. Best of luck on whatever course of action you take.
     
  10. eersfan
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    eersfan Well-Known Member

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    In retail, the key is location, location, location. In your field, it's activity, activity, activity. I started my career in early 1975 as a college agent with Northwestern Mutual. Stayed until I realized I could go independent as a fee-only adviser, do the same work, make more, and not have a District Agent (now known as Managing Director) require that I attend Monday morning sales meetings at 8am.

    It's a tough career. If it was easy, more people would do it.

    Good luck in whatever field of endeavor you choose.
     

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