Major Medical for U.S. Citizens Not Living in the Country

Discussion in 'Health Insurance and Ancillary Benefits' started by Mr. Elias, Jul 21, 2017.

  1. Mr. Elias
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    Mr. Elias New Member

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    Wasn't sure where I could get answers for this, so I figured I'd try here as I always see knowledgeable posts and good information given. I sell life and retirement so the health insurance world is relatively foreign to me, but a good friend asked about this so I'd like to help him if I can.

    This is the scenario: a friends parents are missionaries who live in South America (Peru, I believe) and have no income, no medical coverage, no savings, or any assets. They are U.S. citizens, but don't live in the country, and haven't for several years. They normally don't come back to the states very often. Friend wants to get them some kind of major medical because he thinks he'll get stuck with the bill if they get sick.

    These were the questions I had regarding this: What options do people like this have for major medical? Can they get coverage from an American company and travel back to the country to receive services? Do they have options of getting health insurance in the country they reside even though they aren't citizens there? Would their church potentially have resources for things like this? Any information, guidance, or resources would be greatly appreciated. Cheers to a great community here.
     
  2. LostDollar
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    LostDollar Well-Known Member

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  3. Dave020
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    Dave020 Super Moderator Moderator

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    There are health insurance companies offering coverage for missionaries (as well as personal and business travel overseas). Of the top of my head...

    GeoBlue Global
    IMGlobal
    Atlas Travel (Tokio Marine HCC)
    HTH Travel
    Petersen International

    I am sure there are more. The benefit to these over domestic US health insurance is that they pay in the host country.

    Another story this week of a couple held hostage at a Mexican hospital relying on their domestic health insurance to cover their bills...

    Mexican hospital demands $30K for release of Indiana couple's newborn
     
  4. somarco
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    somarco Well-Known Member

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    I am surprised they don't have health insurance through the sponsoring organization. Most (all?) religious organizations include health insurance for their missionaries.
     
  5. ARus
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    ARus Well-Known Member

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    from my e mail:
    There's a Guaranteed Way to Access Affordable Healthcare
    By Dan Prescher

    As I write this, I'm sitting in a little village on the shores of a broad, mountain-ringed lake on a cool summer morning, reading about how my country's politicians have failed once again to come up with a working national healthcare policy.

    Mexico, where I happen to be right now, has a working national healthcare policy. Ecuador, the country I moved here from, has a working national healthcare policy—one that's been recognized by the United Nations for being one of the most innovative on the planet.

    In fact, every country I've lived in since moving out of the U.S. 16 years ago has a working national healthcare policy. None of those countries are as large as the U.S., or as rich as the U.S., or as powerful as the U.S. And yet, every one of them has a system for making sure each of their citizens, no matter how rich or poor or old or young or sick or well, gets quality healthcare.

    I didn't move abroad for the affordable healthcare. I moved abroad for the adventure and the weather. I wanted to see how other people in the world lived. I wanted a more relaxed, less stressful lifestyle. I wanted warm weather year-round. And I got all those things...the fact that my life became vastly more affordable living abroad was icing on the cake.

    But I also moved abroad to talk to and write about other people who chose to make the same move...especially those who made the move to save their retirements.

    And a lot of those folks did move abroad for affordable healthcare, because outside the U.S., almost any place you go has more affordable, accessible healthcare than back home. And if you're retired or living on a fixed income and have some health issues, the affordability and accessibility of healthcare can make all the difference to your quality of life.

    No one I've talked to can figure out why the richest country on the planet has such expensive healthcare. And by many objective measures, it's not even the best healthcare. A recent study by the Commonwealth Fund studied 72 indicators, including cost, access, and treatment outcomes. It ranked the U.S. in 12th place.

    Behind Canada. Behind France. Behind Australia and New Zealand.

    And, in the opinion of most of the U.S. retirees abroad that I've talked to, behind many countries in Latin America and Asia as well.

    As long as there are more affordable alternatives outside the U.S., retirees will keep seeking them out. They'll lead more affordable lives, and their retirement resources will go farther than they could in the U.S., and they'll keep getting quality healthcare in places—like the village of Ajijic, on the shores of Lake Chapala, which I'm in now—where cool breezes come off the lake on summer mornings and the snow and cold of winter are just distant memories.

    They'll keep moving to warm, exotic communities around the world for more relaxed, less stressful lives at a fraction of the cost back home.

    And they'll continue to get affordable, quality healthcare in the bargain."
     
  6. walthamny
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    walthamny Well-Known Member

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    The list given is pretty good. Most of these plan will expect you to pay for health insurance claims out of pocket and submit a claim. So it is a good idea to have 10 to 20K in credit card limit just in case. On the hand, the blood pressure check at a US hospital costs $800 and the same procedure will cost $4 in Peru so dont so worry about most medical costs as you would here. If your friends have medical issues and if something happened to them they would travel back to USA for treatment, you have to look at medical evacuation and transfer riders. Please talk to an experienced independent agent.
     
  7. Mr. Elias
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    Mr. Elias New Member

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    Thanks for your responses. I greatly appreciate it!
     
  8. Duaine
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    Duaine Well-Known Member

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    Hello Mr. Elias:

    For the past twenty + years I've dealt with the international traveler and missionary community and have found them international health coverage.

    I have several carriers to go to for that coverage. If they would like they can go to my website at: www.Missionary-Services.com or email or PM me.

    Best regards,
    Duaine
    (816-224-9466)
     
  9. ARus
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    ARus Well-Known Member

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    Cigna Global also, but premiums are pretty high. You parents should have option to obtain a local insurance. I will suggest a deep research in their country of residence.
     
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