Part Time Agent

Mar 7, 2007

  1. JHoward
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    JHoward Expert

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    If you have full-time job that pays your bills, is it feasible to work part-time (evenings & weekends) as an agent and build up your book slowly?

    I've read about independent agents losing appointments with companies for failure to produce enough business.
     
    JHoward, Mar 7, 2007
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  2. Crabcake Johnny
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    Crabcake Johnny Guru

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  3. Sam
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    Sam Founder Administrator

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    But not because you will lose your appointments.

    Technically, it is feasible, but I have never met anyone who does it successfully. I do know a few guys who do other things and they keep up their license, and write the occasional life case that falls into their lap, but I have never met anyone who actually does this successfully part-time.
     
    Sam, Mar 7, 2007
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  4. JHoward
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    Can you define "successfully"?

    For me the definition would be that I get good coverage for myself, my family, and the people I already know who are in need of good health insurance and in the end I make more money than I spend doing it (not counting what I spend for myself & my family).

    I have a job that pays the bills and offers me enough freedom to pursue some other interests. If I never become a full-time insurance agent, I won't consider that failure. If I become a GOOD insurance agent, no matter how much money I make I will consider it a success.

    So with THESE parameters, is it still feasible? I have one "yes" and one "no" so far. :)
     
    JHoward, Mar 7, 2007
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  5. Crabcake Johnny
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    Crabcake Johnny Guru

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    This is very serious and if you sell the wrong plan you could put someone in a horrible position. You really need to know what you're doing which requires a lot of training. But who's gonna put their time and effort into training you when they know they won't get anything in return?

    Here's an example; say you have a friend who currently doesn't have coverage. You sell him Aetna and he has high blood pressure. Great, policy comes in the mail and it's off to the doctor to get a check up and meds. Aetna sends a letter declining all claims. Why? Because without credible coverage they have a 12 month pre-ex clause. That should have gone to another carrier.

    When you're new you need an agency or general agent to run your potential clients by to make sure you're doing the proper thing. You'll basically have to self-train which is extremely daunting.

    Have a client choose the CoreMed plan and they're on Lexapro. Fine - into underwriting and no adverse decision. That's great! Client gets the cards and off to to the doctor and get a prescription filled. Claim declined. CoreMed doesn't cover mental/nervous disorders.

    You need in-depth training on how to fill out apps. You're winging it and a client says "well...a year ago my heart was racing so I saw a cardiologist. He said it's probably nothing but just watch it and it's been fine every since. Does that need to go on the apps? When you're new you might not thing so - no diagnosis, no meds, no problems so it doesn't need to be noted. Yes it does.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2007
  6. Sam
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    Sam Founder Administrator

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    Yes, to do what you are describing is possible. However the real issue is, it takes a lot of time and energy to keep up to date on all the products and companies that are out there, and it is much easier to be motivated to do so, if you are making good money from it. If you are just scooping up a little bit, then it gets harder and harder to keep yourself interested.
     
    Sam, Mar 7, 2007
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  7. maryjd123
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    maryjd123 Super Genius

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    ( i like this new board -- much easier to post :0 )

    depending on what kind of agent you are and what you are selling -- I have to say Yes you can --
    because of my husbands and my daughters surgeries this past year -- ( and again because i am sitting at the university of colorado hospital right now in denver with my husband again ) ---
    i have been a caregiver most of the time -- i am down to working maybe one to two days a week -- i try to run anywhere from 5 to 10 appointments a day

    you figure --- even if you ran one appointment a night -- so 5 a week
    if you are selling to seniors

    final expense, medsup or medadvantage plan, part d plan and continental care

    i average 600 - 800 dollars a sale per customer

    so again i have to disagree with the other folks --- it depends on being able to call your customers and to be there when you are needed...

    just my thoughts

    Mary
     
  8. somarco
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    somarco That Medicare Expert Guy

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    You can do it if you are a one call closer & selling something that does not require service after the sale. No way if you are in the health biz.

    I know guys working the mortgage market. They sleep, play golf, go to a movie during the day & work by night. One guy works 4 nights a week, 2 appts per night Mon - Thurs. Writes 3 - 6 deals a week at $800 each.

    Not many can do that.

    He has been doing it a long time.

    He knows his stuff.

    He spends a lot on leads and qualifies, qualifies, qualifies.

    Can you do that too?

    Maybe.

    Maybe, in time.

    Maybe not.

    Maybe not ever.
     
    somarco, Mar 7, 2007
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  9. Arno
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    Arno Expert

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    learning curve

    I think the issue here is the learning curve. Not whether an agent is part time or full time. I am also new to this and am working at this almost full time. 6+ hrs/day. Am I making it, honestly NO, I'm not. Although I started off well, I then needed to shift companies, and now things will be going better shortly. I didn't know or understand anything Petrowski said about the blood pressure, getting denied with one company and accepted by another. Why not, because I'm new, not because i'm part time or full time. I think that it is much easier to work at it full time for a year or two or three, and then scale back operations than it is to try and learn anything working part time. I think that really what would be helpful is that if their was more of an apprentice model for becoming an agent. Learning EVERYTHING on your own is very daunting. What ever you decide, good luck.

    Arno
     
    Arno, Mar 9, 2007
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  10. James
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    James Guru

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    Good information here, I agree while Health may be one of the easiest sales it does require the highest amount of knowledge! Plus it also requires the highest amount of custormer service and the knowledge is very important!

    Yet if you were to shift over to Term or ROP Term and concentrate on families you'll likely run a lot of weekend and evening apt's. The products are fairly easy to learn and the service is not hard to do. Yet it will take a lot of dedication on your part. I don't see it being all that difficult, if I can sell it most can if they really want to.

    I would agree selling Health is not a part time thing.
     
    James, Mar 9, 2007
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