Trying to get on with AGLA

Jan 28, 2008

  1. Walter Sobchak
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    Walter Sobchak New Member

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    Hi y'all,

    I'm in the "prospective" stage with AGLA. Lurking around here, I read some good things about them as far as being a good company to start with if you have no insurance background. I've interviewed twice, and now I'm on to their "Project 100" stage. I'm hoping to do well with this to insure that I get the job.

    Is it really better to get quality prospects, even if it's a good bit fewer than 100? I was told that I should get as many as I can, but 40 (for example) good names are better than filling out 100 spaces with essentially random people.

    What are some other things I should be doing at this point to improve my chances? I'm changing careers from another sales job, but I only was in that for about a year and a half. Prior to that, I was in the Marine Corps, so my "real" business experience is a little thin. Any advice anyone can give would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. arnguy
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    arnguy Guru

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    Just use the local telephone directory and pick out names at random. That's as good as anything else to complete Project 100.
     
    arnguy, Jan 28, 2008
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  3. Delta76
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    Delta76 Guru

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    Just use the local telephone directory and pick out names at random. That's as good as anything else to complete Project 100.

    I disagree. Project 100 can be a great starting point for you. If you do it right, you may never have to cold call again, even though you will want to to get into a better market. Collect good names. Realize the value in the names is not necessarily the business you will get from them, but their referrals to friends and family. The people that know you realize your new, you will get some of those sales a few years in once they see you survive. Their referrals won't know that you just started. Bring a mentor out and have that person close the business for you.

    Visit with each person who grants you a meeting, explain that you just want to go over your approach and get their thoughts. Ask them for other people to speak with and put no pressure on them to buy. Some will anyway, consider it a bonus. If you can ask and receive referrals, you will thrive.
     
    Delta76, Jan 28, 2008
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  4. sman
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    sman Guru

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    The problem with doing a "Project 100" with a company like AGLA is the fact that you really don't want to sell what they have to anyone you know. Their products are inferior. They are mostly a "home service" company which is a dying breed. I think they may be able to sell American General's term product. This gives them something competitive if they can in fact do that. That's probably the only thing I'd sell if I were with them. They may also have something for seniors in the way of burial policies. You're just really handcuffed with a company like AGLA.

    The advantage this person will have is the fact that they'll get their license paid for, a small base pay and learn the ropes a bit. That's about it. There is no way I go to friends, relatives and acquaintances with anything they have to offer other than the American General term product (if they are allowed to sell it).
     
    sman, Jan 28, 2008
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