Disability Insurance for Dental Hygenist

Nov 21, 2008

  1. cjfenton1
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    cjfenton1 New Member

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    I have a client who would really like to get disability insurance but so far hasn't been able to. All the major companies do not provide disability insurance for Dental Hygenists.

    Here is her history:

    4 years ago had a syatic nerve problem for a short while. It has been fixed.

    Has been getting "wholistic" chiropractry care meaning they have never had any problems that would cause them to be uninsurable but she likes going once every 2 weeks to feel better.

    A little over a year ago she started working as a Dental Hygenist.

    She is 29 years old.

    Anyone know who would insure her?

    Much is appreciated.
     
  2. bluemarlin08
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    bluemarlin08 Guru

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    Find a good DI Broker and ask them. I use DI Broker
     
  3. Bob_The_Insurance_Guy
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    Bob_The_Insurance_Guy Guru

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    As of right now, it will mighty difficult for a few reasons:

    -Has been a Dental Hygienist for a little over a year now. Most reputable DI companies will want the last two years income to base on.

    -Had a siatic nerve problem. Doing what? Never mentioned what she did for her previous career. Also, getting holistic treatment is just another way of saying that there is an underlying medical problem that will throw up a red flag, and she don't want it on her records.

    All that being said, have her wait for 24 months of employment as a Dental Hygienist. My guess is, there's a reason she wants this coverage, so soon after starting her DH career, and I doubt it's because she's wise beyond her years.

    Dental Hygienists, as you know, either sit, hunched over the patient, or stand for great periods of time, to assist. That could increase the chances of having another psiatic (sp?) episode.
     
  4. Ray Ray
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    Ray Ray New Member

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    Bob is right . . . the only thing you might want to check out is a policy from Ill. Mutual. The definition of disability may not be as favorable but they may issue a short term policy to her.
     
    Ray Ray, Jan 9, 2009
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  5. SFTICA
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    SFTICA New Member

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    I just remembered Union Central used to do em.
     
    SFTICA, Jan 9, 2009
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  6. The DI Doctor
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    The DI Doctor Expert

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    She sounds to nice not to cover!

    I do not see a problem in getting disability coverage for her. If she works at least 30 hours per week and has no other issues, she may get a partial back exclusion (hopefully not a full back exclusion.

    I can check into cost for you with further detail on the client. Let me know!

    [email protected]
     
  7. LGilmore
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    LGilmore Guru

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    "She sounds to nice not to cover!"

    Lots of nice poeple get told NO for DI.

    Could you be just a hair too smoozy here to drum up business?
     
  8. The DI Doctor
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    The DI Doctor Expert

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    Forgive my charisma, I try to do everything with at least a half a smile... (just hate to have to say no a young lady looking for some help!)

    You are right, there are nice people who are told they can not get disability insurance. Most of my verbal communication starts with someone telling me something like "No carrier seems to want to cover my client", or "My client was declined, can you help?" Many times I have reseached the market and found ways to turn them into yeses. Some are simply uninsurable, but not many.

    One danger with the "nice" people is their positive outlook on life. What I mean by that is there are several who have some problem or condition, like diabetes, and simply put it to the back of their minds. They take care of themselves medically, then lead a very physicallly active lifestyle. The danger is that they may only think to mention their physically active lifestyle. Think about it. If you had MS and had the mindset that you are disabled, it will effect your happiness and eventually possibly your health. If you had MS and chose to enjoy life as if there was nothing wrong (but take care of yourself medically of course), there is probably a good chance you are preventing further health issues. I hate to see these good folks go into underwriting, and get a nasty suprise so I try to help agents get as much info as they can.

    My last entry probably came across like I am some kind of salesman. Waaaaay off base! I actually do research and consultation that ends up helping agents to help families protect their assets. I know that I have helped agents out there save a sale situation. What I really hope is that God forbid some bread winner gets disabled out there, that I was part of the equation in making sure that family had the ability to endure and recover from the situation with as little loss as possible. I hope that we can all do that.
     
  9. LGilmore
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    LGilmore Guru

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    Here's the thing, I know you are probably a nice guy and I may even call on you at some point.

    But let me correct you on your last post in a friendly way... it isn't what the agent thinks or even the insured thinks about a condition... it's what the underwriter thinks.

    Someone who has had back problems and is currently being "treated" chiropractically (even if it is maintence) is going to be seen as "currently under treatment" by an underwriter...no?

    If you can provide help by letting an agent know how you'll work with underwriters to get them to "see" your pov on a case is important.

    DI is the toughest nut to crack in this business. That is why it is so underserved in the market.
     
  10. The DI Doctor
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    I agree with you 100%, it is ALL about what the underwriter thinks literally. That's why I try to help folks realize the twists that can happen with detail, or a lack thereof. Let me give a couple of great examples concerning your point on underwriters, especially for our readers.

    1). Dockworker - (declined) - client stated in application "loading and unloading trucks on a dock."

    The underwriter never realized that transportation and logistics companies have truck "docks" where they load and unload, so she immediately thought "longshoreman" and declined. (Got that fixed.)

    2). Supervisor in a Construction Company - (issued very low class.) The guy used the word supervisor in describing his job management duties.

    The underwriter this time was a guy, and gave me a really interesting option. He said he would be willing to do a 3 way conversation to see if the agent and I could convince him of the white collar nature of the client who actually was an in office manager.

    These two examples really emphasize what you said, as well as what I try to get across to folks that detail is king. Also if one carrier underwriter says no, it can be questioned to confirm if that is really the case. And when one or more says no for whatever the situation is, there still can be other good options that will say yes.

    I am really starting to enjoy these. (Hope you and I build a fan club...) Take care!
     
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