Wolf Parkinsons white disease

Jun 30, 2008

  1. STIBROKER
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    STIBROKER Like My post and enter the DRAWING,,,, Moderator

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    has anyone ran across this one on a health app.....

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    Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome

    What is the heart's normal condition? In a normal heart, electrical signals use only one path when they move through the heart. This is the atrio-ventricular or A-V node. As the electrical signal moves from the heart's upper chambers (the atria) to the lower chambers (the ventricles), it causes the heart to beat. For the heart to beat properly, the timing of the electrical signal is important.
    What is the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome?
    If there's an extra conduction pathway, the electrical signal may arrive at the ventricles too soon. This condition is called Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW). It's in a category of electrical abnormalities called "pre-excitation syndromes."
    It's recognized by certain changes on the electrocardiogram, which is a graphical record of the heart's electrical activity. The ECG will show that an extra pathway or shortcut exists from the atria to the ventricles.
    Many people with this syndrome who have symptoms or episodes of tachycardia (rapid heart rhythm) may have dizziness, chest palpitations, fainting or, rarely, cardiac arrest. Other people with WPW never have tachycardia or other symptoms. About 80 percent of people with symptoms first have them between the ages of 11 and 50.
    How is this syndrome treated?
    People without symptoms usually don't need treatment. People with episodes of tachycardia can often be treated with medication. But sometimes such treatment doesn't work. Then they'll need to have more tests of their heart's electrical system.
    The most common procedure used to interrupt the abnormal pathway is radiofrequency or catheter ablation. In this, a flexible tube called a catheter is guided to the place where the problem exists. Then that tissue is destroyed with radiofrequency energy, stopping the electrical pathway. Successful ablation ends the need for medication. Whether a person will be treated with medication or with an ablation procedure depends on several factors. These include the severity and frequency of symptoms, risk for future arrhythmias and patient preference.
     
  2. somarco
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    somarco GA Medicare Expert

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    Can't say I have seen it on an app, but it is listed in the underwriting guides of at least one carrier (GR) as a decline if symptoms are present.

    Does that address your question?
     
    somarco, Jun 30, 2008
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  3. STIBROKER
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    STIBROKER Like My post and enter the DRAWING,,,, Moderator

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    she is haveing it corrected in nov.and will need a plan in january...
     
  4. TXINSURANCE
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    Texas Health Pool or group all the way - no chance on earth an individual carrier will pick her up, likely ever but certainly not in the short term.

    Even after correction meds may be required.

    My mom has regular Parkinson's - I have heard of this, and it is not good.
     
  5. somarco
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    somarco GA Medicare Expert

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    I had a client a year or so ago that basically got everything done before his COBRA expired. To the underwriter, it looked like he was falling apart. Lot's of check ups, minor surgery and the surgical ablation.

    Going from memory here, and I didn't have H1 as an option at the time.

    Aetna declined him but would reconsider after a year (or maybe less). Time did a 50% rate up and a full heart/circulatory rider. Blue declined. GR did a 1 yr rider for arrhythmia only (not a full ht/circulatory rider).

    He opted for the GR plan and has not had a problem. They dropped the rider after a year.
     
    somarco, Jun 30, 2008
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  6. somarco
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    somarco GA Medicare Expert

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    This is not the same condition.

    WPW is a heart condition that can be surgically corrected.

    Parkinson's is a neurological disease originating in the brain.
     
    somarco, Jun 30, 2008
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  7. TXINSURANCE
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    I am aware, and you are correct.

    Neither will fly with individual carriers though - same story.

    Group or risk pool.
     
  8. arnguy
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    I have not heard of the W-P-W Syndrome, but I have heard of a similar condition called Paroxysmal Supra Ventricular Tachycardia (PSVT) which apparently can be contolled by ceratain medications. However, implanting a Pacemaker appears to be the gold standard treatment although in some cases ablation is used. My understanding that PSVT causes rapid changes in the heart rate which may lead to dizziness or fainting. Strangely enough, it does often affect babies as well as the elderly.
     
    arnguy, Jun 30, 2008
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  9. somarco
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    somarco GA Medicare Expert

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    PSVT is commonly associated with WPW.
     
    somarco, Jun 30, 2008
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  10. arnguy
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    Thanks, Bob.
     
    arnguy, Jul 1, 2008
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