Vinyl Siding Melts From Reflected Heat From Nearby Windows.

Feb 16, 2018

  1. Jeanne310
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    Jeanne310 New Member

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    I have a recorded conversation with the manufacturer where they tell me they are aware the product does this but it's not their problem.

    I realize I need to fix the problem with the neighbors first. I have an attorney and am working on it. I only asked the insurance company what my coverage is. I never put in a claim first because I knew the neighbors had to fix their house first and second because I didn't know if a house that has a death ray pointed at it can be insured.
     
  2. VolAgent
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    VolAgent Guru

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    The last point is the real issue. I fear you will quickly find your home uninsurable or you will need to go to the non-standard or even the surplus market. Even though it is beyond your control, they are going to get tired of constant claims. And if you don't repair it that could lead to water damage.

    Maybe a fence with a metallic lining that reflects it back towards your neighbor?
     
  3. Jeanne310
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    Jeanne310 New Member

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    What constant claims? I haven't made any claims.

    There is absolutely nothing I can do on my end to stop this. The beam is coming from their second story and attic windows right over my 6-foot fence.
     
  4. VolAgent
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    VolAgent Guru

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    If the situation isn't resolved, at some point you're going to get it fixed, which can lead to another claim, and the cycle continues. That is what I mean by constant claims.
     
  5. InsCommentary
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    InsCommentary said:
    Most homeowners policies cover "legal liability" for damage to the property of others. Almost certainly your neighbors have liability for what happened

    AdjusterJack said:
    "Legal liability" involves negligence. I don't see a homeowner being negligent by having Low-E windows installed.

    "Legal liability" usually involves negligence and almost always involve tort, but it can be based in statutory, contract, or criminal law, subject to exclusions. A homeowner has a legal responsibility to maintain safe premises. A premises that is the source of BI or PD to third parties on or off the premises is problematic. The windows arguably infringe upon the rights of the neighbor and the continued exposure they present arguably constitutes a wrongful act or condition. In addition, "neglect" can arise from the failure to do something, in this case, the offending property owner has modified his property in a way that has caused damage to a neighbor's property and I suspect he has an obligation to remove or correct windows that are allegedly causing the damage.

    InsCommentary said:
    quite possibly the manufacturer
    Requires product defect. Is it a product defect that the sun reflects off the window? I have no opinion on that.

    AdjusterJack said:
    or installer
    Requires faulty installation. I don't see the installer having liability for installing the product to the manufacturer's specifications.

    If the installation is causing damage to someone's property, I doubt that the installer can abdicate his responsibility as part of the product delivery chain, especially given that this is a known and widely reported issue that is currently the subject of class action litigation. In the early days of EIFS installation, installers followed manufacturer's instructions but were still held liable, along with the manufacturer, for faulty installations. As it became clearer how important proper installation was, manufacturers' instructions became more specific and the burden of resulting damage is largely borne by contractors.

    Of course, I could be wrong. Regardless, one or both of these homeowners are probably looking at homeowners nonrenewal at some point.
     
  6. djs
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    djs Super Moderator Moderator

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    Buy your neighbor some tinting for those windows. Not sure, but I would assume some tinting would stop the larger part of the refraction from those windows and avoid the problem.
     
    djs, Apr 4, 2018
    #16
  7. Jeanne310
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    Jeanne310 New Member

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  8. Jeanne310
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    Jeanne310 New Member

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    I don't have any nice language regarding my neighbors. All communication ceased when he told me he has more important things to worry about. I need a permanent solution so that I can fix my house. My attorney is working on that.
     
  9. Timmy Weeks
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    Timmy Weeks New Member

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    I had a similar issue with the floor in my house it seemed the glass would magnify the back door's floor and there was a huge brown spot on the wall. It think new windows would fix this not the siding. There are new windows which have high concentrations of argon gas inside that prevent the windows from frying the objects inside your house. I got a good quote form Conservation Construction Of Texas.
     
  10. timmy55
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    timmy55 New Member

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    In my opinion this only happens with older siding. The new siding should be completely resistant to warping, melting, and any other things damaged with the sun like fading. My new siding I got from conservation construction of texas and it's never done this. it may be time to update your siding, but I understand that it is very expensive.
     
    timmy55, Aug 14, 2018
    #20
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